Finding and using your voice matters.

The difference your voice can make is powerful. You may provide comfort to a fellow patient. You may offer a resource to a survivor to improve their quality of life. You may share an experience that allows someone else to use their own voice to find healing for themselves or others.

We invite anyone willing to share their story to allow us to do so. We hope the collection of stories you will find below are helpful to you - wherever you are on your journey.

Share Your Story

Our hope these stories help empower you. Maybe it means speaking up at your next oncology appointment about a symptom you were embarrassed to discuss. Or perhaps it means pushing back when you feel invalidated or unheard.

While doctors may know about your cancer, you are the expert of your own experience. By sharing your story, you are providing a valuable resource to others in a similar situation.

Read stories from cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers below.

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  • Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
  • Bladder Cancer
  • Brain Cancer
  • Breast Cancer
  • Cervical Cancer
  • Colon Cancer
  • Ductal Carcinoma
  • Histiocytic Sarcoma
  • Hodgkin Lymphoma
  • Leukemia
  • Lung Cancer
  • Lymphoma
  • Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
  • Ovarian Cancer
  • Sarcoma Cancer
  • Testicular Cancer
  • Thyroid Cancer

  • Advocacy
  • AYA
  • Be Your Own Advocate
  • Career
  • Caregiver
  • College
  • COVID
  • Doctor
  • Find Your Voice
  • Genetic Mutation
  • GRYT Team
  • Lawyer
  • Mental Health
  • Metastatic
  • Need
  • Neurofibromatosis
  • Oncologist
  • Ovarian Cancer
  • Patient Power
  • Positivity
  • Researcher
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  • Stage 3
  • Stage 4
  • Survivor
  • Tell Your Story
  • Treatment
  • Triple Positive
  • Use Your Voice
  • Vulnerability

Haven’t I Been a Survivor All Along?

Last year, my doctor said the words that I honestly never believed that I would hear. I was told that I was to be moved to a survivorship program. In my head, I thought, "Haven’t I been surviving cancer all along? Isn’t that what I’ve been doing?" Yet now, it had a label. I am a "survivor."


Understanding Life Before and After Cancer

Read Lori's story of her Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma cancer and recurrence. She wrote this story for her own healing as well as to let others know that no matter where you are in your journey, it's OK to be confused, scared, and true to your feelings.


Someone was watching over me, and I am grateful

A story from Dave Kuehnel about his testicular cancer story. He reflects on his experience 35 years later, where having a dedicated caregiver (his girlfriend and now wife) as well as seeking a second opinion helped him get through a trying time.


Dear Doctor (an open letter from a SURVIVOR)

Dear Doctor: You have noted all my surgeries and my late term side effects from my four bouts with cancer. But you don’t know who I am.


K. Desai

COVID-19: Welcome to my World

COVID-19: Welcome to my world. I have been preparing for your experiment with my own. When the experiment initiated, people began to ask questions that they never knew they would need to ask: "When will it be over?" "Who will I be when it dissipates? Who will you be?" "Will we be able to coexist anymore?"


Always Forge Ahead with a Purpose

Learn about Dan Dry Dock Shockley and four words he has kept in mind during his recovery and survivorship of his attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP) diagnosis.


Unsplash

How Can You Help When a Family Member is Diagnosed?

When we talk about cancer in families, the focus understandably tends to fall on the affected patient. As anyone who has dealt with this situation understands though, this kind of diagnosis is very difficult for the rest of the family as well.


Marcy M.

The Good Cancer

I am Marcy from Buffalo, NY. I'm about to be 30, and 6 months ago, during this coronavirus pandemic I started a new journey called thyroid cancer.


K. Desai

How to Go on a Date

I could start my day with a cold shower to try to rub off the internal sound piercing through my hot, unstable body: Covid, Cancer, Covid, Cancer, Covid, Cancer, Covid, Cancer, Cancer.


Liz H.

Choosing to Use Your Voice

Liz shares her experience of her bladder cancer diagnosis, deciding to not be silent about her cancer, and her drive to become a bladder cancer advocate. "You don’t have to reach the masses with your experience, you just have to reach one person."


Christian B.

Christian moves to Director of Digital Strategy role

Christian writes how he is thankful to have had GRYT in his life during his own cancer diagnosis and treatment time... and how he will be helping even more people find and use this invaluable resource.


Emily P.

The Doctors Told Me I Was Too Young for Cancer

The doctors told me I was too young for cancer and since I don’t have any history of breast cancer in my family the tumor in my breast must just be dense tissue. It took several months to get my breast cancer diagnosis after I had to advocate for myself and insist on a biopsy. At the time of my diagnosis, we knew it was already in my lymph nodes but luckily it hadn’t traveled beyond that.


Katie S.

I’m Much More Than My Conditions

It is important to be your own advocate. If you are not comfortable with your doctors, then you need to get a second opinion, even a third and fourth until you are happy with your decision. I decided that it would be best for me to take time off work, and move in with family. I chose to live with my sister who lived in Louisiana.


Emily P.

The Doctors Told Me I Was Too Young for Cancer

The doctors told me I was too young for cancer and since I don’t have any history of breast cancer in my family the tumor in my breast must just be dense tissue. It took several months to get my breast cancer diagnosis after I had to advocate for myself and insist on a biopsy. At the time of my diagnosis, we knew it was already in my lymph nodes but luckily it hadn’t traveled beyond that.


Jearlean T.

I Am Not Defined By My Circumstances

Through my journey I discovered, I am not defined by my circumstances. It is now important for me to inspire, encourage and empower others, especially the ostomy community. I hope my story pushes others to come out of their comfort zone in sharing their story because everybody has a story to tell.


Ashley B.

I Was Not Going to Let a Disease Take My Power Away

Sharing my personal story creates so much awareness, support, and love. We all live on Mother Earth. We all deserve to have power over our bodies, our choices, and our lives. Love your body. Love yourself. Be aware, feel the power, and bring light and love with it.


Amber Y.

Cancer Will Not Take Over Me

I choose life. I’m going to fight to the very end to make sure I’m there for my son’s first birthday, his first steps, my wedding anniversary, my sister’s college graduation. Everything that I was planning before, is still going to be my reality later. I’m choosing to smile through my treatments in hopes to show others that if I can do it, so can you.


Lula C.

Life is Beautiful and It Takes Just a Second to Change Everything

I do a lot to help people who are on this beautiful road of evolution. I am a speaker and talk about my experience and everything I’ve learned. I teach how to really live, and the key to being happy in life is to care, to have tolerance and acceptance. My life now is better and I live it, one minute at a time. Because I now have another opportunity to do it, just for me.


Carol L.

Now I’m Suddenly a Cervical Cancer Patient

The silver lining in my cervical cancer diagnosis was finding Cervivor. This amazing organization teaches women like me that our stories matter and collectively we are smashing the stigma of HPV and cervical cancer. Our mission is to educate and advocate for cancer prevention and this movement gives my story a purpose.


Katie S.

I’m Much More Than My Conditions

It is important to be your own advocate. If you are not comfortable with your doctors, then you need to get a second opinion, even a third and fourth until you are happy with your decision. I decided that it would be best for me to take time off work, and move in with family. I chose to live with my sister who lived in Louisiana.


Emily P.

The Doctors Told Me I Was Too Young for Cancer

The doctors told me I was too young for cancer and since I don’t have any history of breast cancer in my family the tumor in my breast must just be dense tissue. It took several months to get my breast cancer diagnosis after I had to advocate for myself and insist on a biopsy. At the time of my diagnosis, we knew it was already in my lymph nodes but luckily it hadn’t traveled beyond that.